Texas 4000 riders battling cancer over 70 day journey from Austin to Anchorage

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Texas 4000, a group of cycling college students from Austin, Texas stopped in Charlie Lake yesterday on their 50th day of a 70 day ride to Anchorage, Alaska. The group of nearly 60 riders are taking part on the journey as a way of doing their share in the fight against cancer.

There are three routes which make up the annual ride. Charlie Lake is part of the Ozarks route which travels through places such as Illinois, Wisconsin, Manitoba, Alberta, and B.C. before travelling through the Yukon and reaching Alaska.

Rider Levi Joseph said even though he’s always been a fan of cycling he didn’t get in to the event the first time he applied, however that changed after a close friend of his was affected by cancer.

“I’ve always been interested in cycling. My dad is a big cyclist. The first year I didn’t get in, which was kind of for a good reason as Texas 4000 is all about a connection to cancer and at the time I didn’t have much of one. Unfortunately in the year following my best friend’s mother was diagnosed with cancer. I ended up re-applying and the rest is history.”

He added the group ran into a difficult phase relating to the weather travelling through the central part of the United States, but the hospitality along the way made it easier to deal with, and that trend has continued into Canada.

“We had some rough weather for awhile. A stretch from Arkansas to Chicago there was a lot of rain. Past Chicago it’s been great. Were from the south in the United States which is known for its hospitality and Canada has been just as hospitable if not more. Could not be nicer folks. It’s a beautiful country.

After their day of riding came to an end yesterday, cyclists were treated to a steak dinner by the Rotary Club of Fort St. John.

Those on the Ozarks route average 75-85 miles a day.

The first Texas 4000 ride took place in 2004, and since then over $4.5 million dollars has been raised for the cause.

For more information on Texas 4000 click here.

Written by Chase Charney

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